Volunteers Needed for Conservation Commission's Purple Loosestrife Mapping Project x

scarboroughcrossroads

WELCOME

Scarborough Crossroads is a meeting place for local volunteer groups interested in contributing to the town. For more information please take a look at our Frequently Asked Questions.

FEATURE I

Volunteers Needed for Conservation Commission’s Purple Loosestrife Mapping Project

Purple loosestrife, an attractive but invasive wetland species, poses a serious threat to our native wetland plants, and has been documented in all but three counties in Maine. The Commission would like evaluate the extent of loosestrife infestation in the Scarborough Marsh watershed by identifying and mapping the location of loosestrife colonies. The information collected by volunteers will help the Commission decide whether or not it is necessary to join a regional loosestrife control program.

Anyone who would like to help with this project should call Stephanie Cox (799-4012) or the Clerk’s Office at 883-4301 to get a volunteer packet. Packets include a town map, fact sheet with color photo of purple loosestrife, and directions for conducting the survey. Volunteers will be asked to mark maps to show locations of suspected stands of purple loosestrife and rate them on a scale of 1 to 3. No previous survey or scientific experience is required – it’s a great project to do with kids.

Purple loosestrife is a perennial herb, characterized by striking purple flower clusters, that are spike-like and as tall as 20 inches. Blooms appear in southern Maine in July and continue to bloom into September or October. Loosestrife is found in wetlands and also occurs along streams, riverbanks, and the shores of lakes and ponds. Similar to the invasive reed phragmites, loosestrife flourishes in wetland habitats that have been disturbed or degraded. It is also not uncommon to find it growing ditches next to parking lots and roads. An invasion of purple loosestrife is challenging to eradicate once it takes hold, and if unchecked leads to a loss of plant and wildlife diversity.

Contact: Scarborough Conservation Commission
Stephanie Cox, Chair (H) 799-4012

FEATURE II

An Historical and Sociological Look
At New England Quilts
from
1780 ~ 1890
Betsey Telford, Presenter
March 29, 2003

Scarborough High School Cafeteria
20 Gorham Rd
1:00 to 3:30 p.m.

(Snow date: March 30, 2003)

Betsey Telford, an internationally known expert on historic quilts, will be
on hand to explore the historical and cultural impact of New England
quilts dating from 1780 to 1890.She will show quilts from her extensive collection and describe interesting aspects of quilt fabrics, construction, and what a quilt tells about the person who made it.

Betsey is a member of the Antiques Dealers Association, American
Quilters’ Association, and the AQS Study group. Because of her extensive
knowledge and integrity she has been featured on the Discovery Channel,
in Country Living Magazine, the Boston Globe, Japan’s Nahon Vogue, the New England Antiques Journal, and in the March 2003 issue of Down
East Magazine.

The program will be followed by a
Q & A session. Attendees can bring one quilt for a verbal appraisal.
Appraisals will be done as time allows. No food or beverages will be
allowed in the meeting space. Seating will be limited, so please register
early.

Register by using the form provided in the Library Newsletter. Additional forms may be picked up at the Library. For further registration information
call 780-5960.